BY MOTHER TYNETTA MUHAMMAD | LAST UPDATED: DEC 18, 2008 – 3:24:00 PM

Al-Alaq: The Clot—Surah 96

“Do those who disbelieve think that they can take My servants to be friends besides Me? Surely We have prepared hell as an entertainment for the disbelievers. Say: Shall We inform you who are the greatest losers in respect of deeds? Those whose effort goes astray in this world’s life, and they think that they are making good manufactures.” —Holy Qur’an, Surah 18, verses 102-104

tynnetta_khazakh12-16-2008.jpg Mother Tynnetta meeting with Parlimentary representative of the Khazakh Muslim Nation in Mongolia and a representative of the Unification Church who helped to host Mother�s visit in 2006.

When Genghis Khan was born in 1162 A.D., it is written in his biography that clutched in his right hand, was a blood clot. National Geographic magazine refers to this legendary phenomenon in its December 1996 issue on Genghis Khan. The article written by Mike Edwards states: “The future, great Khan was said to have been born with an auspicious clot of blood in his hand. Legend says that his spirit will reappear in a boy-like infant Jargal Chinzoreg in his family’s felt tent, or ger—and lead Mongolia to new greatness.”

An Arab chronicler, Ibn Al-Athir wrote: “In the countries that have not yet been overrun by them (The Mongols), everyone spends the night afraid that they may appear there, too.” At the demise of Genghis Khan, the Mongols speak not of his death but of his ascension, though there was a burial in a secret place in Mongolia that is still unknown today. I am reminded of the words of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad when speaking on the passing of some of the prophets or scientists wherein he stated that their final burial place is not known in the introduction of the book entitled: “Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World” by Jack Weatherford. We read on page xxi (21), “After the secret burial in his homeland, soldiers sealed off the entire area for several hundred square miles. No one could enter except members of Genghis Khan’s family and a tribe of specially-trained warriors who were stationed there to kill every intruder. For nearly eight hundred years, this area, Ikh Khoriq, the Great Taboo, deep in the heart of Asia remained closed. All the secrets of Genghis Khan’s empire seemed to have been locked up inside his mysterious homeland.”

Another anomaly concerning Genghis Khan’s character was that ‘he never allowed anyone to paint his portrait, script his image, or engrave his name or likeness on a coin,’ also stated by author Jack Weatherford. We discover in this a likeness to that of Prophet Muhammad, May the Peace and Blessings of Allah be Upon Him, whose likeness or image was never allowed to be painted or engraved in any way. As we can see, much was left to memory descriptions as to the likeness of these two men. In further writings by Jack Weatherford, in following the story of the boy who was destined to become the world’s greatest conqueror, born in a most remote area of Eurasia near the border of Mongolia and Siberia. “According to legend, the Mongols originated in the mountain forests when Blue-Gray Wolf mated with Beautiful Red Doe on the shores of a great lake. Because the Mongols permanently closed this homeland to outsiders when Genghis Khan died, we have no historical description of it.” When Genghis Khan and his calvary entered the Muslim city of Bukhara (the gem of the Islamic world at that time), he entered the Grand Mosque and walking up a few steps of the pulpit, he turned to its occupants (mostly the elite) and addressed them through interpreters. “He lectured them sternly on the sins and misdeeds of their sultans and themselves. It was not the common people who were to blame for these failures; rather, it is the great one among you who have committed these sins. If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.”

ulaanbaastar12-16-2008.jpg Mother Tynnetta in a warm meeting with Buddhist director and teacher of young girls and women at a Buddhist monastery, in Ulaanbaatar. Photos: Anita Muhammad

National Geographic magazine’s article on Genghis Khan also quotes these words as a fulfillment of prophesy in the following statement: “I am the punishment of God, proclaimed Genghis after leaving the mosque at Bukhara. If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you. Though his words may be legendary, he indeed seemed a divine scourge.” Returning to the ‘auspicious clot of blood’—author Jack Weatherford writes a fuller description of this occurrence on pages 13 and 14 of his book. “According to an often-repeated account, Hoelun’s first baby (Genghis Khan), supposedly struggled into the world tightly clutching something mysterious and ominous in the fingers of his right hand. Gently, but nervously, his young mother pried back his fingers one by one to find a large, black blood clot the size of a knuckle bone from somewhere in his mother’s warm womb, this boy had grasped the blood clot and brought it with him from that world into this one. What could an inexperienced, illiterate and terribly lonely young girl make of this strange sign in her son’s hand? More than eight centuries later, we still struggle to answer the same question that she had about her son. Did the blood clot represent a prophesy or a curse? Did it foretell good fortune or evil? Should she be proud or alarmed? Hopeful or fearful?”

With all the aforementioned information, this now leads me to the title of this article which is the first revelation of the Holy Qur’an received by Prophet Muhammad entitled, Al-Alaq: The Clot, numbered as Surah 96, which instructs the Prophet to read life in the Name of Allah who creates—“Creates man from a clot—Read and thy Lord is most generous who taught by the pen, taught man what he knew not.”

“Those are they who disbelieve in the messages of their Lord and meeting with Him, so their works are vain. Nor shall We set up a balance for them on the day of Resurrection. That is their reward—hell, because they disbelieved and held My messages and My messengers in mockery.”  —Holy Qur’an, Surah 18, verses 105-106

To be continued.

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